Delegating is coaching

I know a lot of people that don’t like delegating… sometimes I am in that group!

But delegating is a lot more than just pushing work around, trying to equalize the piles amongst workers.  It is the single best way I know to ensure that coaching situations develop amongst team members.

The key to turning delegation into coaching opportunities is twofold:

  1. The clarity of the delegation – when tasks or assignments are delegated, there MUST be a clear understanding of what specifically must be done, by when, how it is to be reported, and why the task is important.  (Tell them WHAT, tell them WHY, and tell them HOW.) The clarity of the task delegation is what enables…
  2. Concise followup – Coaching opportunities arise as the delegated task is followed up.  Was it done on time?  According to communicated standards?  To the appropriate level of quality?  Great conversations happen during this followup like “Hey – great work.  But in order to better accomplish X, let’s tweak Y like this… do you see how that works a little better?” or “Ok – we talked about doing X… do you feel like that has been done according to the parameters we discussed?  If not, what can we do to improve it?”.

Because delegation, by definition, creates opportunities to clarify the performance expectations, the vision, and the alignment of the task to the mission of the church (or any organizaton) it is by far the single best creator of coaching opportunites that exists in a normal work relationship.  But the coach MUST make sure to follow up quickly, clearly, and concisely in order to gain those invaluable coaching opportunites.  Somtimes coaches shy away from consie followup because they don’t want to be perceived as confronting, because the conversation may seem “hard”, or because it is simply easier to do it yourself!  Don’t do it!  Invest in your team… use the delegated task as an opportunity to pour into them!

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