Micorsoft takes another stab…

I have loved watching the many itenerations of Windows recent ad campaigns as it reacts to Apple’s campaign and increased market share.  Their most recent ad, in my humble view, takes on yet ANOTHER approach to attacking Apple (no Jerry Seinfeld here :), but is it working?

Here is a great thought from a Fast Company magazine article:

Even Microsoft’s new anti-Apple campaign highlights the vanillaness of Windows–the character in the ad thinks she’s “not cool enough” to own an Apple machine, and opts for a much cheaper (and, though its not described, lower-specced machine). The ad makes no mention of the benefits of the Windows OS at all. Microsoft is portraying itself as irrelevant.

On the other hand, I can definitely see the pricepoint argument they are making… to me, that would be the single clearest line of attack.  What do you think?

See the ad here

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5 thoughts on “Micorsoft takes another stab…

  1. “and, though its not described, lower-specced machine”

    I think this is simply not true. I’m not sure with Pavilion she got, but I found one on the best buy site for $699 with the following: Core 2 Duo 2.0ghz, 4gb DDR2 RAM, 320gb harddrive, 15.4 inch screen, and perfectly adequate video integration.

    On the other hand the $999 white macbook has: Core 2 Duo 2.0ghz (equal), 2gb ddr2 ram (half), 120gb harddrive (much much less), 15.4inch screen (indifferent – people have different preferences), and the whole video card deal?…they are both better than the X3100 (what used to be on the macbook pros in the past).

    I think microsoft’s current marketing is far superior to their sad Seinfeld attempt. I think they image is good.

    Mac commercial communicates idealized identity images connected with creativity and such.
    Microsoft commercial communicates realism and real people connected to less stress on image and functionality.

    I don’t think Mac has won yet.

  2. Sorry : /

    “Microsoft commercial communicates realism and real people connected to less stress on image and functionality.”

    I meant to say… “less stress on image, and more on functionality.”

    And no, that was NOT a Freudian slip : )

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